Benefits

Circadian lighting brings many benefits to the elderly and those living with dementia. We are working closely with Coventry Universtity in conjunction with Warwickshire Care Services to collate and analyse data from target UK projects. Other studies have shown, and our customers have observed the main benefits as:

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  • Better sleep and better nights – read MORE
  • Reduced risk of falls
  • Improved mood and reduced depression risk
  • Improved digestion and increased interest in regular meals
  • Better alertness and cognition during the day
  • Reduced sundowning symptoms

This article from Harvard Medical School explains clearly the many benefits of circadian lighting in the general population, and the risks of not using a dynamic solution.

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/blue-light-has-a-dark-side

Numerous studies are associating and demonstrating links with poor lighting, or using conventional LED lighting at night time is being associated with cancers, obesity, depression and other long trem disorders. Circadian lighting addresses these issues by giving a dynamic light that meets different biological needs at different times of day.

  • Improves sleep 1,4
  • Aids stability of body clock 6 – drives natural eating times, reduces night waking 1
  • Faster recovery times 4,5
  • Energising during the day 6
  • Relaxation at evening/night 1,4,6
  • Promotes healthy activity 4,5
  • Increases productivity 7
  • Improves learning 7
  • Improves concentration 7
  • Improves mood & behaviour 6
  • Reduces hyperactivity/ADHD 7
  • Reduces errors and accidents 7
  • Increase in memory 8
  • Faster cognitive processing speed 8
  • Reduces dementia symptoms 2,3
  • Reduces cardiovascular disease 4,5,9
  • Reduces obesity/diabetes 4,5,9
1 Figuieiro and Read, 2005; Roberts, 2008, 2 Gehrmann, 2005, 3 Torrington , 2006, 4 (Roberts, 2000; Vetch et al., 2004; Cutolo M et al., 2005; Heschong and Roberts, 2009). 5 (Wilson, 1972; Stevens et al., 2007; Rea et al., 2008; Erren and Reiter, 2008; Arendt, 2010) 6 (Santillo et al., 2006; Musio and Santillo, 2009; Gaddy et al., Roberts 1995; Czeisler et al., 1995), 7 (Schulte 2010) 8 (Helbig 2013) 9 Fonken et al., 2010

 

 

 

 

Recent Posts

Evidence: Dynamic light

Presented this week in Chicago, this paper shows how dynamic light that provides a high circadian stimulus during the day, and low circadian stimulus at night can lead to significantly decreased sleep disturbances, depression and agitation in participants with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias compared with baseline. Furthermore, the positive effects observed in the short-term study continued to improve over the course of the 6-month, long-term lighting intervention.

Our circadian solutions are designed to deliver this variation in circadian stimulus automatically.

Monitored light intervention helps improve sleep in Alzheimer’s disease

Image of Mariana Figueiro

Mariana G. Figueiro

Daytime light — when carefully delivered and tailored to individual patients’ eyes and monitored with a calibrated instrument — can improve sleep, mood and agitation in nursing home residents with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, data presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference revealed.

“The research is important because it is nonpharmacological,” Mariana G. Figueiro, PhD, director of the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York, told Healio Psychiatry. “Being able to show the efficacy of a nonpharmacological treatment that helps Alzheimer’s disease patients sleep better, feel less depressed and improve their behavior is very much needed.”

Using a crossover, repeated-measures design, Figueiro and colleagues examined whether a tailored lighting intervention could improve sleep and behavior in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias living in long-term care facilities. Researchers exposed nursing home residents to alternating periods of lighting that provided either high- or low-circadian stimulus for 4 weeks (short-term study) and 6 months (long-term study, successive 4-week periods spaced by a 4-week washout), according to a press release.

The lighting intervention was added to places in which participants spent most of their time awake and was left on from wake time until 6:00 p.m. Calibrated personal light meters were used to monitor light exposures received in patients’ eyes. Using questionnaires, researchers assessed measures of sleep disturbances (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), mood (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia) and agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Index) at baseline and during the last week of the intervention.

According to the release, 43 residents participated in the short-term study and 37 residents completed the long-term study. The results showed that the lighting intervention lead to significantly decreased sleep disturbances, depression and agitation in participants with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias compared with baseline. Furthermore, the positive effects observed in the short-term study continued to improve over the course of the 6-month, long-term lighting intervention.

“Our study showed that light, when tailored to deliver the correct amount of circadian stimulus to the patient’s eyes, can be effective as an adjunct therapy to help Alzheimer’s disease patients sleep better, reduce their depression symptoms and agitation behavior,” Figueiro told Healio Psychiatry. “When properly prescribed and delivered, robust light-dark patterns can help Alzheimer’s disease patients improve sleep and behavior. But, it needs to be properly designed and delivered.” – by Savannah Demko

Reference:

Figueiro M, et al. Tailored lighting intervention to improve sleep, mood and behavior in Alzheimer’s disease patients. Presented at: Alzheimer’s Association International Conference; July 22-26, 2018, 2018; Chicago.

Disclosure: Figueiro reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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